TPOXX: The first drug to treat smallpox approved by FDA

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The New York Times

Smallpox

The disease, Smallpox, is the first disease to eliminate from the world through public-health efforts and vaccination. Now, the US Food and Drug Administration declared its approval of the first drug to treat smallpox.

As per FDA, smallpox symptoms begin 10 to 14 days after a person infected and the disease spread by direct contact. The symptoms include fever, headache, backache and exhaustion.

The rashes develop into pus-filled sores, which become scabs and then scars. Some people experience inflammation of the brain, sores on the surface of the eye and blindness, all considered complications of the infection.

TPOXX antiviral drug

In this manner, the FDA gave priority review to TPOXX, a small-molecule antiviral treatment made by SIGA Technologies Inc. FDA approve based on research treating animals infected with viruses that relates to the virus that causes smallpox and clinical trials for safety in healthy people.

FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb stated, it is the first approval granted under the Material Threat Countermeasure Priority Review Voucher, which noted that this underscores its commitment to ensuring that the US is prepared for any public health emergency with timely, safe and effective medical products.

As of now, the treatment comprised of managing side effects and treatment with three antivirals not demonstrated to treat the disease but rather the best potential line of safeguarding. In addition, the vaccine would use to prevent the disease from spreading.

TPOXX is the first approved treatment, particularly showed for the treatment of this infection. As indicated by the CDC, the last natural outbreak of smallpox in the United States occurred in 1949. The last naturally spread case in the entire world happened in 1977.

While, the US CDC and the Russian State Centre for Research on Virology and Biotechnology are the only two labs in the world that approve and known to have smallpox.